Architecture is for Everyone. #Arch4All

2022 AIA Architecture Tour Saturday, April 30, 2022 from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Advance Online Ticket can be purchased online for $10
OR you can purchase tickets during the tour at any of the tour locations. $20 day of the tour 

Please note:

-The tour takes place rain or shine. There are no refunds.
– Shoe booties or shoe removal may be required before entering some of the tour locations.
– Children 10 and under attend free.
– There are no public restrooms on the tour.

CLICK HERE FOR 2022 TOUR GUIDEBOOK

PURCHASE TICKETS BELOW:

I (the party agreeing to these terms by reserving, purchasing, and/or participating in the tour) hereby waive any and all claims I may have now and in the future, and release from all liability and agree not to sue AIA Central Oklahoma, its officers, agents, representatives, employees or tour locations owners for any personal injury, death, property damage, or loss sustained by me as a result of my participation in the AIA Architecture Tour due to any cause whatsoever, including without limitation, negligence on the part of AIA Central Oklahoma, its staff, tour partners, or other participants, or death or injury as a result of war, civil unrest or pandemic.

 


This year’s tour locations include:

Wheeler District Spoke Street Shophomes
1708 Spoke Street, Oklahoma City, OKC 73108

Architect: Sam Day, Dryline Architecture
Contractor: Wheeler Home

Bringing a unique product type to the Oklahoma City market, the Spoke Street Shophomes provide the opportunity to live, work and play all in one place. These ten live-work townhomes deliver micro-retail and attainable housing for an entrepreneurial subset of buyers. In each three-story home, the ground-floor can be purposed for retail, office, makerspace, workshop, and more, while the upper floors serve as a comfortable living space.

The Shophomes are flexible, allowing the living and working units to function in tandem or independently. Separate entry doors for each townhome’s residential and commercial suites create a flexible and noninvasive relationship between the two programs. These dual entry doors on narrow façades establish a dense, intimate scale to the pedestrian street. Just a few doors down from The Big Friendly Brewery and Taco Nation, the Shophomes are in the heart of the Wheeler District.

Heartland Payment Systems
616 N. Broadway, OKC


Image by Scott McDonald, Gray City Studios

Owner: Real Capital Solutions
Architect: Rand Elliott Architects
Contractor: Lingo Construction Services

The Heartland Headquarters project in downtown Oklahoma City converted a surface parking lot at NW 5th and Broadway into a seven-story, 111,530 sq. ft. mixed-use office building, bathed in natural light. It is located along OKC’s Automobile Alley Historic District and adjacent to the Central Business District. With an Automobile Alley Historic District site designation, it was important that our solution remained respectful of the historic context. The Heartland building pulls inspiration from the classic proportions found in many of the historic buildings on Automobile Alley – its success residing in the scale and proportion of its forms. The building adheres to the ancient Greek principles of scale and proportion based on the Golden Ratio. The limestone-colored brick exterior pulls inspiration from nearby limestone buildings while the scale of the windows changes as you move from north to south – smaller windows are on the building’s north side where a similar design can be seen in the existing historic buildings and larger windows are placed toward downtown where glass curtain walls are popular. From a bird’s-eye view, the building is in an L-shape, with a protected, outdoor garden space on the east, adding interest and vitality to an existing alley. From the east, you can see the show-stopping feature of the cantilevered sixth floor conference room offering spectacular views of the eastern horizon. Inside, the seven-story building has two retail spaces on the first floor, one on the north end and one on the south. Office space occupies Floors 2-7.

AK87- Fitzsimmons Residence
1300 NW 17th Street, OKC


Image by Steve Voelker

Owners: Audrey and Ken Fitzsimmons
Architect: Ken Fitzsimmons of TASK Design
Contractor: Ken Fitzsimmons/ Bryan Beavers Construction

Audrey and Ken Fitzsimmons bought the vacant infill lot at the corner of Klein and NW 17th St. in 2008 with plans to build their new home someday. The design evolved over the years, but the goals stayed the same: build something fun, multifunctional, comfortable, and affordable with less impact. They rezoned the 50×140 lot into two lots allowing up to 4 dwelling units. More density = less sprawl and more walkable/ livable communities. The house’s attached dwelling unit can serve as home office, place for family/friends, or rental unit. The exterior responds to the unique setting surrounded by a variety of building types. The simple asymmetric gable roof fits in with the more traditional residential neighbors while the corrugated metal, dark wood and pops of color are intentionally modern and distinct. Strategically placed windows allow daylight and views while maintaining privacy. The side court-yard with porch is designed to serve as an outdoor room and over time the plants and artwork will make it a lush retreat. Reduced impact features include:

-ac/ heat systems within continuously insulated roof and walls
-ceiling fans / windows circulate air while overhangs block direct sun in summer but let some in during winter to reduce usage of heat and air
-pesticide free, pollinator/ edible/ native plants reduce water usage and maintenance
-cork flooring
-recyclable/ reflective/ durable metal cladding installed over rigid foam insulation
-insulated windows with low E coating
-LED lights / dual flush toilets conserve resources

Belle Isle Library
5501 N. Villa Avenue, OKC 73112


Image by ADG, PC

Owner: City of Oklahoma City (Operated by Metro Library System)
Architect: ADG, PC
Contractor: Wynn Construction

ADG was hired by the Metropolitan Library System to enhance their iconic Belle Isle Library branch. Widely known and loved, the 17-sided building was originally designed in the early 1960s with a mid-century modern aesthetic. The goal for the renovation and addition was to expand its building footprint and make the existing space work more cohesively. The 11,500 square foot addition was carefully designed to enhance the vintage look of the building while also incorporating eye-catching color and plenty of glass for natural lighting. The new addition includes large meeting room spaces, special children and teen areas and quiet study rooms. Much of the new addition has large glass curtainwalls that allow parts of the original stone wall to show through from the outside, while providing a natural feel from the inside. The circulation desk and staff work areas were updated with a modern look and added technology. A statement acoustical element over the central info desk adds a striking design element as well as easy wayfinding. Previously tucked away on Northwest Expressway, the building now sits with more prominence and serves as an unofficial gateway to the Belle Isle neighborhood.

Oklahoma State Capitol Interior Renovations
2300 N. Lincoln Blvd., OKC

Owner: Office of Management and Enterprise Services
Architect: FSB Architects + Engineers
Contractor: Manhattan Construction

FSB’s exceptional ability to work hand-in-hand with multiple user groups and ascertain all details of a project up front was a huge asset in this multi-phase intricate project. Referencing old drawings obtained from state archives, private sources and the U.S. Library of Congress, along with documents from previous partial renovations, our team first conducted a thorough on-site review of the building’s engineering systems. These were found to be severely inadequate and outdated. In many instances, the original plumbing and electrical wiring were still in place, both dangerously decayed, while the HVAC, fire protection and additional systems also needed to be replaced and brought into compliance with modern safety and performance standards. The most significant change to the structure was the transformation of the lower level into the primary public entrance, where visitors will step into an expanded and completely redesigned Capitol Museum, which includes 18 rotating art exhibition areas. Multiple phases of the project were required, due to the sheer scope and complexity of the restoration, as well as the need to make repairs with minimal disruption for the state employees and elected officials who work inside the building. After the initial assessment, our team created a BIM model, which is being used throughout the project as a guide for the myriad of fixes that must be accomplished, along with master planning to delineate the complete vision. By creating a plan which did not require relocating employees to other buildings, FSB saved the state approximately $7 million in leasing costs.


Thank you to our Architecture Week Sponsors!

PLATINUM

BELL & MCCOY LIGHTING AND CONTROLS
JE DUNN CONSTRUCTION

GOLD

ACME BRICK
AC OWEN CONSTRUCTION
MANHATTAN CONSTRUCTION
NABHOLZ CONSTRUCTION
PREMIER LIGHTING SALES
WALLACE DESIGN COLLECTIVE

SILVER

BOLDT CONSTRUCTION
CHAMPION DESIGNS & SYSTEMS
CLS & ASSOCIATES
CMSWILLOWBROOK CONSTRUCTION
DARR + COLLINS CONSULTING ENGINEERS
THE DOCUMENT CENTER
GE JOHNSON CONSTRUCTION
GUERNSEY
MILLER TIPPENS CONSTRUCTION
PEC
PELLA WINDOWS & DOORS OF OKLAHOMA
RICK SCOTT CONSTRUCTION
SMITH AND PICKEL CONSTRUCTION
SPUR DESIGN
THERMAL WINDOWS
TIMBERLAKE CONSTRUCTION

BRONZE

HALFF ASSOCIATES
JHBR ARCHITECTURE
LINGO CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
MA+ ARCHITECTURE
SMALL ARCHITECTS
TAP ARCHITECTURE
TERRACON